I’ve gone viral!

Since my cord blood transplant I have been beset by one viral infection after another and sometimes two at the same time.  Apparently it is more common with cord blood transplants because the stem cells are immunologically naive, more so than their adult counterparts they have no antibodies or immunity imprint.

The main culprits have been parainfluenza type 3, adenovirus and rhinovirus (click on the links if you want to know more). Whilst my symptoms have not been much worse than a cough and a cold, these viruses, particularly adenovirus can be life threatening in immune suppressed patients after an allo transplant. This virus has been with me more or less since my transplant, sometimes when I am tested it has gone but then it comes back again. It means that when I attend clinic appointments or the day unit, I have to wear a mask as an infection control measure and sit in a separate waiting area on my own or with other patients with masks on too which is annoying as I can’t catch up with my transplant mates and my glasses get steamed up. It feels a bit lonely and isolating.

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Initially I regarded having these viruses as a nuisance which they still are but I have come to realise that they could have serious consequences for me. I almost scared myself to death reading the following about adenovirus:-

“Viral infections may be associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT)1–3. Common viral infections after allo-HCT include those due to cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus. Other viruses, such as adenovirus, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, coxsackievirus, and rotavirus, are less common among allo-HCT recipients. However, adenoviral infection (AI) has been reported to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality in these severely immunocompromised patients.

Adenovirus is a double-stranded DNA virus that was first isolated in 1953 in a human adenoid tissue-derived cell culture. It has approximately 100 serotypes, at least 51 of which are known to infect humans 16. Infection occurs throughout the year but is most common from fall to spring. This virus can be transmitted by inhalation, inoculation into the conjunctival sacs, and probably the fecal-oral route. AI manifests as a number of clinical syndromes, including rhinitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, conjunctivitis, enteritis, hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis.”

(Extract from an article in the Bone Marrow Transplant Journal 2013 entitled “Adenoviral infections in adult allogeneic hematopoietic SCT recipients: a single centre experience” )

 

I’ve noticed now that persistent URTI’s (Upper Respiratory Tract Infections) as well as hypertension (high blood pressure) are listed as my co-morbidities in the letters from my consultant to my GP.

To try and boost my immune system to fight against these viral infections I have been having monthly infusions of immunoglobulins which having had 4 now don’t seem to be doing much good. I have also been on antibiotics most of the time which are really only of prophylactic effect since they don’t work on viral infections.

A few weeks ago on a Friday I was in the Haematology day unit for some reason I can’t now recall since I am there so often, when my lovely transplant nurse, Nijole, sprung on me the news that the boss wanted me to start a treatment called Cidofovir, to try and tackle the adenovirus. This was to start on Monday and would be administered 3 times a week taking around 4 hours to administer by infusion with fluids. I could feel tears start to well up and Nijole asked what was upsetting me. Between sobs I told her that on Monday I was starting the first lesson of the Spanish class that I had enrolled on so it meant I would have to miss it. What a baby! But what it represented to me was a step into the normal world, doing something other than being ill, recovering from my transplant and going to hospital. Nijole said we would work round it and I could have the treatment after the class had finished so I did go but the level was a bit too advanced for me so I have been bumped down to a another class on a Thursday afternoon after all that fuss!

And so I started this gruelling regime of antiviral treatment the following Monday which has been hard going. Early starts to get to the hospital in the morning following nights disturbed by coughing fits, my body wanted to lie in. On the days in between the treatment, I felt wiped out and nauseous. I had wrongly assumed it would just be for a week but then found out it would continue for 3/4 weeks.  It felt like going to work which incidentally it is just over a year since I gave up. No regrets about that, but on the other hand there’s not been much opportunity to actually miss it as pretty much since then I have had VDR pace, my second autologous transplant and my cord blood transplant. In all probability I would have been on the sick for the last year and there has barely been a day when I would have been capable of going to work. I don’t miss it but do miss my colleagues.

During the three weeks of Cidofovir stuck to a drip in the day unit, I inevitably encountered other patients with blood cancer also having treatment and chatted to some of them.  Sometimes it was a good way of passing the time but sometimes it was just depressing and I wished I’d kept my head down reading a book. There were post allo patients being treated for severe and various forms of GVHD  a couple of years or more on from their transplants which was scary. Some were very poorly.  I had to remind myself that the well ones wouldn’t be in the day unit requiring treatment. I felt quite wretched during this period especially when I found out afterwards that I still had adenovirus so the treatment had no effect and also had rhinovirus again. To add to the grimness, I also attended the funeral of a fellow myeloma patient at the MRI whom I had come to know quite well during the last couple of years. Of similar age and diagnosed at around the same time as me Jane had a donor transplant in 2012, enjoyed some remission and made the most of it but upon relapse her myeloma eventually stopped responding to treatment and took over. Her funeral was inevitably sad but a moving celebration of her life and what came across to me was that she didn’t let her illness stand in the way of doing the things she felt strongly about.  It drove home to me that I must do the same. I have a tendency to say to myself I’ll do this or that when I am better but I may never be better than I am now so I want to do what I can do now as far as possible and not put anything off until I’m recovered or in remission or not so tired. This GIF is quite apt, I need a new wall clock, maybe I should try and find one like this!

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Clearly I need to strike a balance between looking after myself, not overdoing it, avoiding risk of infection and doing the things I want to do. Travel abroad is probably still out whilst I am tapering off the immune suppressants and have infections but there are other things I can do and have done. During this sweet gentle autumn we have been enjoying I have played tennis, been on cycle rides and even an anti austerity demo! Oh and of course, learning Spanish!

Vivir el momento que puede!

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Filed under Cancer, chemotherapy treatment, Cord Blood Transplant, Health, Life and death, Multiple Myeloma, Myeloma, Relapse, Remission, Stem cell transplant, Uncategorized

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